Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘salsify’

Pan-fried black salsify, overwintered and harvested in SpringTwo Autumns ago, I didn’t get around to digging up the black salsify before Winter covered the garden with a blanket of snow. I was pleasantly surprised last Spring to discover that it had overwintered beautifully – even through Ottawa’s cold winter.

After digging up the deep-reaching black roots, David prepared the salsify in a simple pan-fry and it was delicious. Tender, sweet, subtle, creamy. I’d say the winter even improved its texture and flavour.

Last Fall, we were lazy again… and rewarded again with a healthy harvest of black salsify this spring. What a way to maximise the garden! At the end of the season, we’re busy eating the chard and kale. By spring, we’re so happy to eat something different and fresh, even if it’s only one meal.

Preparing black salsify is a bit of a pain, because of its sticky sap. Usually we peel it, immerse it immediately in lemon water, then boil it until tender in some vegetable stock. Finally we pan fry it with a generous amount of butter, a couple of springs of thyme and season it with salt and pepper.

I just read though that it can be boiled first and then peeled. We’ll have to try that method next spring!

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

NasturtiumMid-October and half of the beds in my garden are still occupied with Swiss card, kale, salsify, carrots, beets and fall lettuces. I’ve put off harvesting them, because I haven’t had time to process them and don’t have the appropriate indoor cool storage space. I figure they’re better “stored” in the ground for the time being.

I’m not worried. These are the hardier vegetables, resistant to lower temperatures. Some, like kale and carrots, I’ve read will get sweeter and/or more tender as they are exposed to the cool temperatures (and even frost).

As fall progresses, fresh vegetables from the garden become a bigger treat.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Read Full Post »